Married with Children Wiki
Advertisement

A Man For No Seasons was the 193rd overall episode of Married... with Children also the 10th episode of Season 9. Directed and Amanda Bearse and written by Kim Weiskopf, the episode originally aired on FOX-TV on November 13, 1994.

Synopsis[]

When Major League Baseball goes on a strike, NO MA'AM organizes their own league sponsored by nudie bars and their owners.

Storyline[]

When Major League Baseball goes on a strike because of disagreement between players and owners, Al and NO MA'AM come up with a brainstorm idea; they organize their own league sponsored by nudie bars! They are very successful, but finally they also go on strike, due to a dispute over player salaries, which mirrors the MLB Players strike. This episode is a take on the strike that ended the 1994 MLB Season during the early summer of that uncompleted season.

Title[]

This is a parody of the play based on the life of Thomas More - "A Man For All Seasons" - with the added aspect of the baseball season, or rather lack thereof.

Recurring Cast/Regulars[]

Guest starring[]

  • Mike Piazza as Himself
  • Bret Saberhagen as Himself
  • Danny Tartabull as Himself
  • Frank Thomas as Himself
  • Dave Winfield as Himself
  • Joe Morgan as Himself
  • Pat Millicano as Sticky
  • Shaun Toub as Akbar

Notes[]

Title[]

  • The title of this episode is a reference to the play and 1966 film "A Man for All Seasons"

Trivia[]

  • This was the first appearance of the recurring NO MA'AM member Ike.
  • During the end credits, part of it reads "For Rocco - April 19, 1979 - October 23, 1994 - Purr, Purr, Purr"

Cultural References[]

  • The episode debuted during the 1994-95 MLB strike, which cancelled the remainder of the 1994 season along with the postseason that year.
    • The 1994 season was one of the biggest seasons yet at the time of cancellation.  For example, the single season record for home runs, held by Roger Maris with 61, was in serious jeopardy with San Francisco third baseman Matt Williams in the lead.
    • Also, San Diego Padres outfielder Tony Gwynn was close to batting 400 on the season and stood at 394 at the time of the strike.  The last batter to bat 400 was Ted Williams in 1941.
    • At the time of the strike, the Montreal Expos had a record of 74-40 and were leading the NL East.  After the strike was ended by future Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayer, the team's players got sold off in a fire sale. The Expos never recovered, and after nearly being contracted out of existence in 2002, were relocated to Washington D.C. for the 2005 season and renamed the Nationals, where they eventually won the 2019 World Series.
      • Some experts believed that the Expos were World Series contenders and had a good shot at the title despite having the 2nd lowest payroll in baseball.
    • It also prevented a oddity that was threatened due to the strike but not repeated since, the winner of the AL West was poised to finish under 500.
    • Finally, 1994 was supposed to be the debut season for a third round of postseason play called the Division Series. This was scheduled due to each league spitting into three divisions each and with a Wild Card for each league.
      • Though there was a Division Series in 1981, it was also a strike year which forced MLB to split the season into two halves. The first half division winner faced the 2nd half winner for a shot to advance to the LCS.
        • Ironically, this is the only season Montreal made the MLB postseason as 2nd half NL East winners. The Expos would eventually lose to the eventual World Champion LA Dodgers in the NLCS.
    • Towards the end of the episode, a news reporter mentions that both baseball and hockey are on strike. This is in reference to the 1994-95 NHL Lockout that saw the season shortened (although unlike baseball, it was resolved and the season did eventually start)
  • The guest stars and their positions/jobs in baseball at the time of the strike.
    • Mike Piazza: He was a catcher with the Los Angeles Dodgers
    • Bret Saberhagen: He was a starting pitcher for the New York Mets
    • Danny Tartabull: He was an outfielder/designated hitter for the New York Yankees
    • Frank Thomas: He was a first baseman for the Chicago White Sox
    • Dave Winfield: He was an outfielder/designated hitter for the Cleveland Indians.  He was traded to Cleveland on August 31st for dinner as Twins and Indians executives went to dinner with the latter picking up the tab.
    • Joe Morgan: He was a hall of fame second baseman for several teams with the most notable being the Cincinnati Reds.  At the time of the strike, he was a broadcaster most notably with ESPN and worked the 1994 All-Star game in Pittsburgh along side Bob Costas and Bob Uecker.
  • When Bud sees Bret Saberhagen as the pizza deliveryman, Kelly asks if he really is Saberhagen, why does his name tag says "Bobby Bonilla". Bobby Bonilla was at the time this episode was filmed a third baseman/right fielder for the New York Mets as well as one of the highest paid MLB players.
  • Towards the end, the news reporter who mentions the failure of the Nudie Bar League also mentions that "Saturday Night Live just won't end". This is a reference to the long running NBC sketch comedy, which has been perceived by some to be in a constant state of declining quality since it's sixth season in 1980-81 (ironically around the time this episode aired, SNL was seriously considered for cancellation by the network, but was saved following a major cast overhaul the following season, and is still on the air as of 2020).
  • Part of Griff's initiation included watching the CBS Western drama Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman.
  • Marcy and Peggy reveal that they have tickets to see Ace Ventura: The Musical which stars Nell Carter, Joyce DeWitt and "that guy that played Horshack":
    • Ace Ventura is a fictional pet detective played by Jim Carey. At the time this episode originally aired, the character had his own film, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, followed by a sequel a year later and an animated series. Though there was no musical ever made for the franchise.
    • Nell Carter was an American singer and actress who was best known for her role on the 1980s NBC sitcom, Gimme a Break. At the time this episode aired, she was one of the stars on the ABC sitcom, Hangin' with Mr. Cooper.
    • Joyce DeWitt is an American actress who is best known for playing Janet on the 1970s sitcom, Three's Company.
    • "The guy that played Horshack" is a reference to actor Ron Palillo who played the character Arnold Dingfelder Horshack on the 1970s sitcom, Welcome Back, Kotter.
  • During the montage of the Chicago Cleavage playing, Akbar and the other attendees do the "Tomahawk Chop" a celebratory move in which the forearm moves forwards and backwards repetitively with an open palm to simulate the chopping action of a tomahawk.
    • In MLB, it is usually associated with the Atlanta Braves and in the NFL, the Kansas City Chiefs, as both teams use Native American themes in their logo and branding.

Music[]

  • The National Anthem of Baseball "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" is played during the montage of the Chicago Cleavage playing while the audience cheers.

Locations[]

Sets[]

  • Bundy Living Room / Kitchen
  • Bundy Garage
  • Police Station Holding Cell
  • Gary's Shoes Seating Area / Cash Register
  • Baseball field / Stadium Seating
◄ Season 8 Season 9 Episodes Season 10 ►
Shoeway to HeavenDriving Mr. BoondyKelly Breaks OutNaughty but Niece
Business Sucks (Part 1)Business Still Sucks (Part 2)Dial B for VirginSleepless in Chicago
No Pot to Pease InDud BowlA Man for No SeasonsI Want My Psycho Dad (Part 1)
I Want My Psycho Dad: Second Blood (Part 2)The Naked and the Dead, but Mostly the NakedKelly Takes a Shot
Get the Dodge Outta Hell25 Years and What Do You Get?Ship Happens (Part 1)
Ship Happens (Part 2)Something Larry This Way ComesAnd Bingo Was Her Game-OUser Friendly
Pump FictionRadio Free TrumaineShoeless AlThe Undergraduate
Advertisement