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I Want My Psycho Dad (Part 2) was the 196th overall series episode of Married... with Children also the 13th episode of Season 9 of the series. Directed and Gerry Cohen and written by David Castro, the episode originally aired on FOX-TV on December 18, 1994.

Synopsis[]

Part two of two episode story and conclusion. Al and NO MA'AM take their case to have Psycho Dad put back on the air to Washington, D.C. They lie to their wives, but Peg and Marcy find them. Through Jefferson's connection they address the senate, but the Psycho Dad ban is not lifted. The kids party hard back home and it makes to the national news.

Storyline[]

Conclusion. Al and NO MA'AM take their case to have Psycho Dad put back on the air to Washington, D.C.. They lie to their wives, but Peg and Marcy find them. Through Jefferson's inexplicable intelligence community connections they address the senate, but the Psycho Dad ban is not lifted. The kids party hard back home and it makes to the national news.

Recurring Cast/Regulars[]

Guest starring[]

  • Tom McCleister as Ike
  • J. Patrick McCormack as Senator Furman
  • T.C. Warner as Pam
  • Barry Wiggins as Geronimo
  • Michael Philip as Chopper
  • Joseph D. Reitman as Tom (as Joseph Reitman)

Notes[]

Title[]

  • The title of this episode is a reference to the slogan used by cable music channel MTV during the early 1980s.
    • The second part of the title, "Second Blood (Part 2)" is a reference to the 1982 film Rambo: First Blood Part II, which is the second film of the Rambo film franchise.

Trivia[]

  • In 1993, MWC co-creator and producer Michael G. Moye got into a dispute with FOX over this two part episode (which was still in the early writing stage at the time and had been slated to be released during season 8), claiming that the network was trying to censor it. He believed that they did this as an attempt to appease Congress, following Attorney General Janet Reno who wanted to crack down on television violence.[1][2]
  • Joseph D. Reitman who plays Tom, the guy that Kelly makes out with before Al beats up, previously appeared as Kelly's boyfriend, Genghis in "Naughty but Niece".
    • The clothes that he is wearing is the same exact outfit he wears when he played Genghis again in the season 10 episode "The Weaker Sex", which could imply that Tom and Genghis are the same character.
  • Peggy reveals that Al never liked ice fishing

Cultural References[]

  • After Al mistakes Philadelphia's nickname "The City of Brotherly Love" for Washington D.C., he asks what is Washington. Officer Dan then tells him "A team without a quarterback!" causing the group to laugh.
    • This is reference to the Washington Football Team, which at the time this episode was filmed, was known as the Washington Redskins. During their 1994 NFL season, the Redskins had one of the worst records in the league, with only 3 wins to 13 losses and having no wins at their home stadium, RFK Stadium.
      • Sadly for Washington, every other team in the league has won at least one home game in 1994.
    • The actual answer to Al's question, what is Washington known as, would be either "D.C." or "The District"
  • After the first drive by shooting at the motel occurs, Griff sarcastically asks them if the "John Hinckley Arms" was booked?
  • Ike asks the group how can get into Congress without credentials and Bob Rooney mentions singer Sonny Bono was able to do that.
    • Sonny Bono was a singer, actor, politician and former husband to singer/actress Cher. He became involved with politics in the late 1980s, serving first as Mayor of Palm Springs, California and then as a representative of California's 44th district until his death in 1998.
  • Officer Dan mentions that Jefferson was named after a U.S. President, but Ike tells Jefferson that he thought he was named after Sherman Hemsley.
  • After the second shooting at the hotel room, Officer Dan yells "Damn postal workers!".
    • This is in reference to multiple cases of United States Postal Workers going on mass shooting sprees since 1983, citing excessive stress from their jobs. In 1993, these types of shootings lead to the creation of a slang term called "Going Postal".
  • After Officer Dan fires several shots at the postal workers, he yells out "Hey, we're from Chicago! Don't you know we invented random violence!". The city of Chicago has had a long history of violent crimes, with 83% of homicides in the city involving gunfire as of 2011.
  • During his speech, Al mentions that a few things television could be blamed for include:
    • Brent Musberger - American sportscaster who was known at the time this episode aired for providing coverage for sporting events on ESPN and ABC before his retirement in 2017. He also worked at CBS from 1975 to 1990 with his most notable assignment being host of "The NFL Today."
    • Full House - Family sitcom that ran on ABC from 1987 to 1995
    • Any show where overweight female cop dress up as hookers... - Likely referring to the 1980s police drama, Cagney & Lacy, which focused on the lives of two female NYPD detectives. In the pilot tv movie and 1st episode series, the two detectives, who are in their 40s, go undercover as prostitutes.
  • After Al tells the Senate "Take my kids...please" and no one laughs, Jefferson tells him "Kennedy's on the floor", which Al tells him "Kennedy's always on the floor!". This is in reference to Ted Kennedy who was a long serving Senator and brother of former U.S. President, John F. Kennedy. He was often known for his heavy drinking even while on the Senate floor, as Al alluded to.
  • After saving Senator Fuhrman, Al suggests that he should cancel Blossom and implies that the robber got the idea to wear a hat from the show.
    • Blossom was an NBC sitcom that aired from 1991 until 1995. The show focused on a girl named Blossom who often wore quirky and unique hats.
    • Michael Stoyanov, who played Blossom's oldest brother, previously guest starred on MWC as the pizza deliveryman who takes back the pizza Al ordered after his card was rejected in "You Gotta Know When to Hold 'Em (Part 1)".

Locations[]

Sets[]

  • Bundy Living Room / Kitchen
  • Hotel Room
  • U.S. Senate Chamber floor / hallways

Goofs[]

  • After Officer Dan mentions that Jefferson was named after a U.S. President, Ike tells Jefferson that he thought he was named after Sherman Hemsley, who played the character George Jefferson on the sitcom The Jeffersons. Jefferson didn't deny Ike's statement, but simply shrugged. However, Ted McGinley was born in 1958, nearly 17 years BEFORE the pilot episode of The Jeffersons was filmed. Therefore, his character Jefferson D'Arcy, who is approximately the same age, could not possibly be named after George Jefferson.
    • Though it is possible that he chose "Jefferson" based on the character as part of his new identity. He had previously stated in "The D'Arcy Files" that Jefferson D'Arcy is not his real name due to his work for the CIA.
    • This could also be an instance of breaking the fourth wall, as the producers, who as previously mentioned worked on The Jeffersons, may have had the series in mind when naming Ted McGinley's character. Jefferson, however, could be a reference to Jefferson High School, the fictional institution on Happy Days where Roger Phillips (played by McGinley) taught.

References[]

◄ Season 8 Season 9 Episodes Season 10 ►
Shoeway to HeavenDriving Mr. BoondyKelly Breaks OutNaughty but Niece
Business Sucks (Part 1)Business Still Sucks (Part 2)Dial B for VirginSleepless in Chicago
No Pot to Pease InDud BowlA Man for No SeasonsI Want My Psycho Dad (Part 1)
I Want My Psycho Dad: Second Blood (Part 2)The Naked and the Dead, but Mostly the NakedKelly Takes a Shot
Get the Dodge Outta Hell25 Years and What Do You Get?Ship Happens (Part 1)
Ship Happens (Part 2)Something Larry This Way ComesAnd Bingo Was Her Game-OUser Friendly
Pump FictionRadio Free TrumaineShoeless AlThe Undergraduate
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